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True stories from dispatchers, law enforcement, fire and EMS personnel who use New World public safety software to help them save lives, protect communities and increase efficiency


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Dana Rasmussen

Dana Rasmussen is a senior marketing communications specialist for Tyler Technologies. She began her career working with public safety officials as a reporter covering the police beat. She has written about the work of dispatchers, law enforcement officers, fire fighters and the communities they serve.


In Case You Missed It

Take a look back at this article to find out how the Oxnard Police Dept. in California was able to reduce the number of gang shootings in the city through the use of intelligence-led policing techniques.


Reducing Gang Activity Using Predictive Policing

With intelligence led policing, the Oxnard Police Dept. in California is reducing the number of gang shootings in the city.

Located in the Greater Los Angeles area, and with a population of about 207,000 residents, the Oxnard Police Department (PD) continually seeks ways of effectively addressing gang violence.

To combat this problem, the Oxnard PD uses information-driven policing techniques to help address gang activities, especially when there is a connection with violent crime.


Police Connect Cases to Arrest Serial Burglar

In the spring of 2017, dozens of burglaries were reported in the city of Clovis.

Located in California’s Central Valley, Clovis averages approximately 1,000 burglaries per year. However, the city shares a border with the city of Fresno, which has the second-highest property crime rate in the county.

According to Sgt. James Munro of the Clovis Police Dept., law enforcement officers worked with crime analysts to determine a pattern among the burglaries. To do this, data was taken from the Clovis PD’s law enforcement records management system.

Watch Sgt. James Munro of the Clovis PD discuss using data to reduce crime

This data showed when and where individuals reported their vehicles were broken into along with what was stolen, which included wallets, purses, and valuables.

This information was gathered by victims' reports, security camera footage, time of day, and location of the burglaries. Individuals also reported the type of vehicle used to flee the scene, although none could get a read on the license plate number.

With all of this information, crime analysts with the Clovis PD were able to connect cases and identify a pattern.

"Our crime analysts were able to use this information generated from our records system, which helped us connect all of the open burglary cases," Munro said. "When you're able to connect cases not only can you potentially identify a suspect, but you can also start developing a crime pattern,".

By connecting cases and examining data within the police department's records system, a suspect was identified and his description was shared with officers.

The suspect was apprehended during a routine traffic stop when the patrol officer noticed he fit the description of the burglary suspect and had stolen property in his vehicle. The Clovis PD closed more than 40 open burglary cases as a result of arresting the individual.


Sending Responses to Multiple-Alarm Fires

In a fire emergency, every second is crucial. That's why dispatchers must work quickly to send the appropriate response to the scene.

When a summer lightning storm caused multiple fires in an Oregon community, dispatchers with the Marion Area Multi Agency Emergency Telecommunications Center (METCOM) were tasked with providing effective coverage to their citizens.

METCOM Dispatcher Discusses Saving Time with Fire Response Plans in CAD

 

To do this, dispatchers relied heavily on built-in fire response plan capabilities in METCOM's computer aided dispatch (CAD) system. These plans dictate what units and capabilities are needed for a specific call and help get a response moving as quickly as possible. Because fire emergencies can escalate quickly, these plans also take alarm levels assigned to fires into consideration.

When dispatchers escalate a fire emergency to a higher alarm, which indicates the severity of the fire emergency, they know exactly what type of response will be sent to the scene with pre-determined responses built in to CAD.

According to METCOM director Gina Audritsh, dispatch centers throughout the United States use the term level and alarm synonymously when discussing fire emergencies.

"It's important that dispatchers can assign alarms in CAD to fire emergencies and get the right response to the scene as quickly as possible," Audritsh said. "Without these capabilities, sending the best response takes longer."

According to Audritsh, there was a time before METCOM upgraded its CAD system when dispatchers relied on paper maps and manual processes when sending a response.

"At METCOM, we've come a long way," Audritsh said. "We've grown to dispatch for 29 agencies. To do this effectively, we needed a CAD system capable of getting our first responders on the scene as quickly and safely as possible. We have that capability now and our responses have improved so much that our fire departments have experienced improved scores with their insurance rating as a result."


Catching Up with The Call

When a fire broke out at an Oregon high school, dispatchers relied on response plan capabilities built into their CAD system to get help on the scene as quickly as possible. Take a look back at this article to find out how response plans help dispatchers send the best response possible.


Dispatch Sends Quick Response to School Fire

When a fire tore through an Oregon high school, fire crews worked diligently to prevent injuries to students and staff.

The fire started in early May of 2012, which was just six months after the Marion Area Multi-Agency Emergency Telecommunications Center (METCOM) went live on its computer aided dispatch (CAD) software.

This meant that all those working at METCOM were using new technology that had changed their workflow significantly. However, this structure fire provided METCOM with the opportunity to test the new system and its fire response plan capabilities.


Police Mobilize After Commuter Train Derailment

A train crash is something many commuters never even think about until it happens.

In the early morning hours of Feb. 24, 2015, an individual mistakenly drove his truck onto the grade crossing of a railroad track in Oxnard, CA. The truck became stuck on the track and the driver exited the vehicle without calling for help.

Within 12 minutes, the truck was struck by a commuter train traveling from East Ventura to Los Angeles at 64 mph. The train derailed sending three of its five cars onto the roadway alongside the track.

Almost immediately after the derailment, 9-1-1 calls began flooding dispatchers in Oxnard. According to the Oxnard PD's IT Manager Raja Bamrungpong, an accident of this magnitude resulted in numerous public safety agencies responding.

"As soon as the calls came in to dispatch about the train crash, we knew this would be a large response," Bamrungpong said.

Dispatchers with the Oxnard PD sent a fast response to the scene using their computer aided dispatch (CAD) software.

Find out more about CAD usage in California agencies: 40 Burglary Cases Closed Through Connecting Data

With CAD, dispatchers see where all first responders are located on a digital map. In the event of an emergency with possible life-threatening injuries like in the train crash, this ability to see where units are located along with their estimated times of arrival (ETA) data helps send the fastest response to the scene.

Within minutes, officers from Oxnard were on the scene along with several other law enforcement agencies and fire departments that were dispatched to assist in the response.

At the time of the accident, more than 25 individuals who were passengers on the train were taken to area hospitals and treated for injuries.

"Being able to respond quickly to an accident as large as the train derailment and provide services to all those impacted is something we strive to do as an agency," Bamrungpong said.


Tips from Public Help Law Enforcement Capture Gunman

When a gunman was on the loose in rural Oregon, public safety personnel worked quickly to get the killer into custody.

In late June 2016, a 911 call came in to the Marion Area Multi-Agency Telecommunications Center (METCOM) reporting a shooting incident. The caller stated that at least one person was dead and others were injured. The shooter had fled the scene.

The dispatcher who took the call immediately began collecting more information and entered it into his computer aided dispatch (CAD) system. The dispatcher discovered the shooting took place in a rural area that bordered two county jurisdictions; METCOM dispatches police and EMS to one of the counties and uses mutual aid from the other county. Mutual aid is an agreement among emergency responders to lend assistance across jurisdictional boundaries.

Due to the severity of the call, the dispatcher with METCOM dispatched the local city police department to respond as automatic aid and coordinated efforts with mutual aid fire and EMS districts. Automatic aid is assistance that is dispatched automatically by a contractual agreement between two fire departments, communities, or fire districts.

When the first rescue units arrived on the scene, they began treating two victims who had gunshot wounds; the third victim was already dead.

"This particular call for service was something we don't get a lot of at METCOM," director Gina Audritsh said. "Being that the incident took place in a rural area, we're glad we had the ability to dispatch first responders to this call and get the individuals the help they needed."

As an active homicide investigation with the shooter's whereabouts unknown, METCOM dispatchers coordinated a multi-agency response. This included auto-paging the incident activity to the agency's Homicide Investigation Team and Tactical SWAT team from Woodburn Police Dept.

To track all responders involved in this call for service, dispatchers monitored activity using the automatic vehicle location functionality (AVL) available in their CAD maps. This provided dispatchers with the ability to track locations and denote any area that fell within the boundaries of each law enforcement jurisdiction so that all agencies could be notified.

In addition, METCOM's incident commander tracked all activity on CAD using built-in functionality that allowed for browsing where all units are located and what calls they're responding to, which ensures no communication was lost between agencies.

This ability to track tips and location information and add narrative about the crime and search for the suspect helped the five dispatchers assigned to the call, command staff, first responders and everyone else working the case to access mission-critical information throughout the search and investigation.

Within eight hours of the initial call for service, the suspect was captured outside of the county trying to flee the state.

"This was a major incident for our community and it had a lot of moving parts," Audritsh said. "Having the tools necessary to ensure we can provide a level of service to our residents is remarkable."


Celebrate the One-Year-Anniversary of The Call

Now's your chance to win! To celebrate the one-year-anniversary of The Call, we want to hear from you. We're offering a new poll each week for the next three weeks as a way to help us know what we could do better to meet your needs. Each completed poll will automatically enter you for a chance to win an Amazon Alexa. Remember to visit The Call each week for new polls, stories, and videos.

Get your first entry for a free Alexa by filling out the poll on the right of the page!

The winner will be contacted via email.


Reducing Gang Activity Using Predictive Policing

With intelligence led policing, the Oxnard Police Dept. in California is reducing the number of gang shootings in the city.

Located in the Greater Los Angeles area, and with a population of about 207,000 residents, the Oxnard Police Department (PD) continually seeks ways of effectively addressing gang violence.

To combat this problem, the Oxnard PD uses information-driven policing techniques to help address gang activities, especially when there is a connection with violent crime.

In the spring of 2017, Oxnard experienced a rash of gang-related shootings, some of which were fatal. To address the violence, Oxnard PD Assistant Police Chief Jason Benites said that staff worked to identify parts of the city that were most likely to experience this violent crime.

Detectives, officers, and crime analysts worked together using data to identify these locations, so they could increase police presence in areas where the shootings occurred most frequently.

To do this, Benites said staff pulled information regarding the shootings from the department's law enforcement records management and analytic reporting systems. These systems helped determine when and where the shootings occurred, who was involved, and circumstances surrounding the events.

"When you can look at data that says the specific areas where an event has occurred and the specific time it occurred, it helps you to identify patterns," Benites said.

By collecting this data, the department was able to redeploy patrol officers to specific areas during specific times where the shootings occurred most frequently. Almost immediately, this increase in police presence helped reduce the shootings significantly.

"Having the ability to gather data that helps us strategically use our limited resources to their maximum potential helps us keep the community of Oxnard safer," Benites said.


Dispatch Sends Quick Response to School Fire

When a fire tore through an Oregon high school, fire crews worked diligently to prevent injuries to students and staff.

The fire started in early May of 2012, which was just six months after the Marion Area Multi-Agency Emergency Telecommunications Center (METCOM) went live on its computer aided dispatch (CAD) software.

This meant that all those working at METCOM were using new technology that had changed their workflow significantly. However, this structure fire provided METCOM with the opportunity to test the new system and its fire response plan capabilities.

According to METCOM's director Gina Audritsh, when structure fires are reported, dispatchers must task the CAD system with producing an in-depth response. For instance, when a large structure fire is reported, response plans and preplans created by METCOM CAD managers and administrators for specific scenarios are drawn upon for a response.

In the case of the high school fire, as soon as the dispatcher entered the type of call into the CAD system, it knew the appropriate fire district to pull the response from along with which apparatus to send. In this case, three engines and a ladder truck were required for the first alarm.

"As soon as fire crews left the station, we had reports coming in that smoke could be seen coming from the building," Audritsh said. "That bumped the fire up another alarm immediately."

As the fire continued and escalated to a four-alarm response, the dispatcher used the CAD system to look at neighboring jurisdictions to pull more fire crews and apparatus to the school.

"What's great about our CAD system is that it already knows what ladder truck is the closest, which units are available and what stations can respond to any incident," Audritsh said. "This system can go deep within itself to pull more and more resources out so that any emergency gets the proper response. This prevents us from having to get on the phone and call other agencies and departments when an emergency is taking place."

While the school was damaged by the fire, there were no reported injuries and students returned to the building within a week.


The First Half of 2017

From fugitives on the run to massive pileups, the stories from The Call show the type of dynamic situations dispatchers, first responders, sworn officers, and civilian employees handle on a daily basis and the role that technology plays while they make communities safer together.

In looking back at the first half of 2017, the following posts and videos to The Call highlight the work of public safety personnel throughout the country:

Have a story you would like to share with The Call? Let us know!