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True stories from dispatchers, law enforcement, fire and EMS personnel who use New World public safety software to help them save lives, protect communities and increase efficiency


Identity Theft in Traffic Citations

When an officer issues a citation, it's a routine procedure in most instances. The officer checks the driver's license, fills out appropriate information and then provides the driver with the citation. The officer leaves and, in many cases, the ticketed driver pays the citation fee and life goes on.

But sometimes, the citation is issued to the wrong individual.

According to court services director Steven Cherry of the Grand Prairie Municipal Court in Texas, there are individuals who dispute citations regularly saying they were victims of an identity thief.

In these instances, a citation was issued to an individual who was not even in the vehicle at the time of the traffic stop.

"We used to get individuals coming in and saying that they were issued a citation that they should not have received," Cherry said. "Now when that happens, we can look through our system at the photo taken by our ticket reader device used by the officer and determine if the claim is true or not. When they are telling the truth, the photos help prove that they really weren't the ones on the hook for the ticket."

According to Cherry, in these instances, friends or family – and in some instances, strangers – are using a stolen driver's license, so the citation is issued to an undeserving individual. Luckily, police officers with the Grand Prairie PD use ticket readers with cameras, so photos of drivers and any other pertinent evidence or information can be taken when a citation is issued.

"Before we had a device capable of taking a photo of the individual receiving a ticket, we had no way of proving the claim," Cherry said. "But now, we can look right at the evidence and say, 'wow, you are correct.'"

With photos accompanying electronic citations, tickets issued in Grand Prairie are given to the appropriate individuals. That means if a ticket initially went to the wrong person due to driver's license theft, photos taken during the citation process ensure that the appropriate individual receives the citation.

"Prosecutors always praise us for taking the extra steps necessary to collect evidence," Cherry said.

Watch: Improved Accuracy with eCitation


Police and Fire Officials Work Together to Capture Gunman

When a gunman was on the loose in the Kansas City metro area, law enforcement officials worked quickly to protect the community.

In the late summer of 2017, residents of an apartment complex called 9-1-1 to report gunshots being fired. Immediately, dispatchers sent first responders from the Independence Police Dept. and Independence Fire Dept. to assist those in need.

The dispatcher handling the call for service worked quickly to include all details in the computer aided dispatch (CAD) narrative, which allowed first responders to have instant, real-time updates on their mobile device terminals (MDTs).

"In a situation like this, information is vital," Independence FD's Battalion Chief Cindy Culp said. "Being able to share information back and forth with the police department from dispatch is helpful so that we can all work together on incidences that are criminal, medical or otherwise require a response from fire and police."

In this case, shots were fired at around 11 a.m. in the apartment complex. Witnesses who called 9-1-1 reported an individual saying she had been shot and that an individual was seen fleeing from the scene. Passersby attempted to run after the suspect, who then fired shots again and fled from the scene.

"Anytime you have a suspected shooter flee from a scene, it creates a potentially dangerous situation for everyone in the community," Culp said.

To protect the community, schools in the area were locked down and citizens were urged to stay indoors.

The suspect was captured quickly thereafter and arrested by authorities.

"This shooting highlighted one of the many incidences where the police and fire departments work together," Independence PD records administrator Joanna Whitt said. "We're lucky we had the ability to share information back and forth, so that all first responders were equipped with information that they needed as it pertained to their roles in the field."


Dispatchers become critical component of rescue efforts during Hurricane Harvey

On a typical day in the neighboring communities of Nederland, Port Neches, and Groves, Texas, three dispatch operators are responsible for answering and routing all 911 calls in the area – around 60 to 70 calls each day.

That all changed in the fall of 2017.

By August 30, 2017, Hurricane Harvey had shifted course in the Gulf of Mexico and unexpectedly poured 64.51 inches of rain on the communities, most of which came down in one day. 

Fighting heavy rains and historic flooding, two additional operators were brought in to manage the call volume. Working night and day for five days, the dispatchers managed the more than 3,200 calls from residents in their communities and around the region.

This storm was Chief Paul Lemoine's fourth hurricane with the Port Neches Police Department, and, in his experience, communication has always been key to a successful operation.

His department faced the challenges of technology that couldn't keep up during previous storms. With no way to take outside calls because of failed communication systems, officers had previously been forced to rely on word-of-mouth communication, he said. In the past, flooding neighborhoods with volunteers and officers going door-to-door was necessary to ensure everyone got the help they needed.

But, not this time.

Throughout the weather event, dispatchers continually relayed pertinent information about people in need and physical road blocks to officers in the field using walkie talkies and cell phones.

"We all had houses that had flooded, and we were all actively doing water rescues for several hours at a time, and we were being inundated with rescue requests," Lemoine said. "We really relied on our dispatchers to relay that information to keep us from wasting time and continually moving forward. It was the middle of the night. We were up to our necks in water, getting in and out of boats, so it was really a lifesaver for us."

When the rain stopped, the sun finally reappeared, and the flooding started to recede, dispatchers helped direct officers to find and rescue more than 180 people. Empowered with timely, accurate information and a connection that lasted through the storm, no lives were lost and no officer was injured in the field.


Using Data to Stay Safe on the Scene

In a community with abandoned or otherwise dangerous buildings, prior knowledge about a location can mean the difference between life and death for fire crews.

According to Cindy Culp, battalion chief with the Independence Fire Dept. in Missouri, access to first-hand knowledge about structures helps fire fighters stay safer when responding to emergencies throughout the city.

Independence is located in the Kansas City metro area. Like many communities near large cities, there are areas with blighted structures and other buildings in disrepair. When fire crews are dispatched to these areas for a fire or other emergency, it's important for them to know what potential danger can be found on the scene.

"As soon as fire crews have boots on the ground, they're working toward keeping everyone safe on the scene, from the civilians involved to the crews themselves," Culp said. "But they also want to prevent or reduce any damage, especially during a fire call."

Watch: Fighting Crime in Independence, Missouri


To ensure fire crews have all of the information they need while on the scene of a fire or other emergency, fire crews access data on the mobile data terminals (MDTs) located in their rescue vehicles.

This data comes directly from computer aided dispatch (CAD), and provides crews with information about the location including prior history, onsite known hazards or chemicals, hydrant locations, and anything else pertinent to staying safe.

"Anytime fire crews are in a building that has the potential to collapse due to damage from disrepair or fire, it's important that they know this before entering the structure," Culp said. "We're able to provide our fire crews with this information, so they know what they might encounter in a given situation."


Putting Big Data to Work With Public Safety Agencies

Public safety agencies throughout the United States gather an enormous amount of data every day. With the ability to harness and use this data, public safety personnel have the actionable intelligence needed to employ intelligence-led policing initiatives and create safer communities.


Keeping Up With Future Requirements in Public Safety

As communication needs continue to change, it's important to have technology that stays ahead of trends and meets future requirements. With many public safety answering points (PSAPs) preparing for or implementing Next Generation 911, understanding what that initiative entails is critical.


Identifying and Patrolling Areas of High Crime

With map-based computer aided dispatch (CAD) systems, dispatchers in public safety agencies ensure patrol effectively covers an entire area – not just criminal hotspots. The Greenbelt Police Dept. in Maryland uses this technology to keep their community safe.



System Cuts Time Between Emergencies, Responses in West Virginia County

Source: Charleston Gazette-Mail
By Giuseppe Sabella

A Kanawha County sheriff’s deputy used three letters to describe her dangerous foot pursuit: AVL.

The automatic vehicle locator tracks first responders from more than 50 agencies throughout the county, and it may have saved Cpl. Stephanie Adams’ life.

Metro 911 officials said the upgrade launched in September and has since helped law enforcement, paramedics, firefighters and county residents.

Read the full story …


Reducing Thefts with Predictive Policing

When public safety agencies have predictive policing capabilities, law enforcement officials use data to predict, prevent, and reduce crime. The Everett Police Department, located in Snohomish County, Washington, used predictive policing capabilities to reduce thefts in the city.


In Case You Missed It

Take a look back at this article to find out how the Kankakee County Sheriff's Office in Illinois, was able to use information sharing and data integration to bring a burglary ring to justice.


Burglary Ring Busted by Law Enforcement

When cutbacks in 2015 resulted in a reduction of officers on patrol throughout Kankakee County, the county experienced a rash of burglaries.

For three weeks, burglars ransacked homes in search of guns, jewelry, electronics, cash and anything else of value.

"It got to the point where you were either a victim of the burglaries, neighbors with someone who had been a victim or afraid of becoming a victim," according to Becky Powell, Investigation's Officer Manager for the Kankakee County Sheriff's Office.