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True stories from dispatchers, law enforcement, fire and EMS personnel who use New World public safety software to help them save lives, protect communities and increase efficiency


Police Department Fights Increased Burglaries With Drug Taskforce

A sudden influx of gang activity and drug trafficking in the town of Levelland, Texas has saddled the 28 officers at the local police department full caseloads. Not only are they partnering with state and federal agencies to stop the gangs, but they are also managing the secondary crimes associated with drug use.

"When you're talking about gang membership, you're also talking about robberies, thefts, burglaries – those kinds of things," said Levelland Police Chief Albert Garcia.

While the first crime committed when dealing with narcotics is often transportation of a banned substance, the people who purchase the final product often do so using money from stolen goods.

"When it comes to substance abuse, the compulsion to use may lead those struggling with addiction to do just about anything to get their hands on more drugs – including stealing," according to an article written by Mental Health Worker Marisa Crane.

The Levelland PD is actively managing those cases by helping the victims to recover lost property and pursue justice, but the only way to truly stop these types of crimes is to remove the offender's access to drugs.

"One of the most important things that we try to stop is the influx of narcotics being transported through our city," Garcia said. "The methamphetamines are very prevalent in our area, just as it is throughout the entire State of Texas, but most of these narcotics are being transported, delivered, and sold by gang members."

To combat the gangs and stop the transport of drugs, Levelland PD has teamed up with area police departments as well as state and federal agencies. By sharing information between agencies and across jurisdictions, the involved police departments have been able to follow suspects from one community to another and eventually make an arrest.


Arming First Responders With Data

Data-driven intelligence goes a long way for first responders.

In Salina, KS dispatchers arm first responders with information that helps keep them safer on the scene of a call for service.

To do this, dispatchers have built-in capabilities in their computer aided dispatch (CAD) system that includes building contact information, known onsite hazards, entry points, notes about prior incidences with residents, and other details that could impact the safety of responders.

This information is especially useful when a call for service comes in regarding someone with any sort of medical condition, according to lead dispatcher Angela Fuller with the Salina Police Department.

Read more from the Salina PD: Patrol officers catch burglars in the act

In one instance, this medical information was used when first responders were headed to an incident involving a residence with numerous disabled residents.

"When we know in advance that there is a situation involving someone with any type of disability, we can let first responders know what they might be dealing with," Fuller said. "This is especially useful in case of a fire emergency so our fire crews know that there could be individuals inside who are unable to evacuate."

First responders view this information on their mobile data terminals, which help them see vital CAD information in real time. With the ability to relay details about a call for service on a mobile device, another layer of privacy is extended to those in need. This is especially beneficial for any call involving sexual assaults and protected medical information.

While medical information is always private and separate radio channels are used for relaying information from dispatch to first responders, mobile CAD provides this same information in real time.

"Without mobile CAD capabilities, first responders would need to call in to dispatch to receive certain information surrounding patient's privacy," Fuller said. "Mobile CAD allows us to keep this private information secure, while also allowing first responders to access the pertinent data immediately."


Texas Town Works Across Jurisdictions to Stop Gangs

Located in the Texas panhandle, Levelland is made up of around 14,000 residents that welcome upwards of 9,000 students to attend its community college each year. While standard motor vehicle accidents, domestic disturbances and criminal mischief calls take up the majority of the police department's time, a larger threat is emerging in the tight-knit community.

"When I started with Levelland, we had a lot of homegrown-type gang memberships, and now its gone further out into more of a global-type," said Chief Albert Garcia of the Levelland Police Department. "A lot of these gangs might be affiliate gangs of the larger gangs, but no matter how you cut it, the larger gangs are who are operating the smaller affiliates in our city."

But, not for long.

Local law enforcement has worked tirelessly to prevent thist threat from evolving into a major problem. Specifically, by targeting the gangs' key business interest — drugs.

 "These gangs have a lot of the resources needed to move and relocate large amounts of narcotics from one point of the United States to another," Garcia said.

To combat the rise in gangs and prevent the transport of drugs, Levelland PD has teamed up with other state and federal agencies.

By sharing information between agencies and across jurisdictions, the involved police departments have been able to follow suspects from one community to another and eventually make an arrest.

Working with the DEA and other drug and gang taskforces, the Levelland PD has been able to stop the transport of massive amounts of narcotics, Garcia said, including cases with methamphetamine packages ranging from 22 to 40 pounds.


Firefighters Battle Grass Fire And Tornado

Dispatchers everywhere know that emergency situations can change rapidly.

For instance, when the fire crews in Shawnee County, Kansas were on the scene of a grass fire and a tornado touched down, dispatchers alerted the fire crews to take cover.

"At that time, two things were happening with the situation and back at the dispatch center," Melanie Mills-Bergers, interim director for Shawnee County Emergency Communications Center (SCECC) said. "On one hand we had the fire and the tornado happening. We also had to switch our CAD system from our normal mode of operation into storm mode, which helps us to better facilitate calls for service."

Taking the CAD system into storm mode helps reduce the response of fire personnel due the plethora of calls during a severe storm. It assists with ensuring enough resources are spread throughout the covered area in order to handle the extreme number of calls for service.

Storm mode does not prioritize or relate calls nor assist with duplicate calls.

"When we had fire crews out at the grass fire and that tornado came, we knew they had to get out of there and take shelter," Mills-Bergers said. "We also knew we needed to handle that call for service correctly as it entailed two major events."

To ensure the fire crews were kept safe, they left the scene of the fire and took shelter. By staying in contact with dispatch using their mobile device terminals (MDTs), the fire crew was alerted to when it was safe to return to the area.

"Even with a small tornado, call volumes increase," Mills-Berger said. "Facilitating those calls in storm mode in CAD helps us streamline responses and keep processes flowing. What's important is that we have a system that keeps up with the calls, so that citizens get the help they need when they need it and our first responders have access to as much information as possible through all aspects of a response."  


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Each week, questions will center around stories told that represent the way public safety personnel has helped save lives, increase efficiency, and make communities safer.


Public Safety Agencies Create Safer Communities

From traffic citations to hurricanes to burglary rings, public safety personnel are always ready to provide help when it’s needed most.

Explore these stories to discover how these individuals from law enforcement agencies and fire departments of all sizes throughout the US helped create safer communities.

Three Ways Law Enforcement is Using Technology to Stay Connected During a Crisis
Working Together to Fight Crime
Officers Issue Citations in Less Than Three Minutes
CAD System Withstands Historic Flood in Louisiana
Lightning Strike Causes 6-Alarm Fire in Rural Oregon

Got a story you’d like to share? Let us know!


Faster Response Times Create Safer Communities

In the world of public safety, dispatchers play a pivotal role in emergency responses. Severe weather, fire emergencies, and criminal acts all require first responders to get on the scene as quickly and safely as possible. To get them there, dispatchers need computer aided dispatch (CAD) tools.

Explore these feature stories to read about how agencies from across the United States help create safer communities when responding to calls for service.

40 Burglary Cases Closed Through Connecting Data
Lightning Strike Causes 6-Alarm Fire in Rural Oregon
First Responders Arrive on Scene Faster with Better Navigation Tools
Tattoos Help Public Safety Official Identify Body
A Deadly Terrorist Attack: Lessons Learned


Dispatchers and First Responders Protect Community During Tornado

Dispatchers deal with life and death situations every day on the job. They're used to the pressure that comes with an intense call for service and being relied on to send the appropriate response to an emergency. That's why it takes quite a bit to get a dispatcher to refer to one particular day as worse than any of the others.

But according to Denise McKinney, Chief of Communications for the Ouachita Parish Fire Department in Louisiana, there's one day that stands out to her as the worst in her history on the job.

When Ouachita Parish including the cities of West Monroe and Monroe was hit by an EF2 tornado in December 2013, long after tornado season had ended, first responders worked diligently to aid those in need. According to the Enhanced Fujita scale, which is used to rank the severity of tornadoes, an EF2 indicates a storm with wind speeds of up to 135 mph.

"The storm started in the southwest end of the parish and continued to move throughout the community," McKinney said. "We were getting a lot of calls, but no one was using the word 'tornado' in the calls. What we were hearing was that there was a lot of wind and a lot of trees were coming down."

As the storm continued to move through the area, Ouachita Parish 911 received an onslaught of calls from residents who were trapped in their homes or unable to get home due to trees in the roadways. In addition, lightning from the storm caused many house fires, and rescuers needed clear pathways to get to those in need.

"The storm really tore up the area," McKinney said. "We had a lot of off-duty firemen come out with their chainsaws to clear pathways on the roadways so residents and emergency vehicles could get around. We were also getting calls from our public works personnel who let us know which roads had been closed, which was beneficial as it allowed us to enter that information into our computer aided dispatch (CAD) system."

By entering this information into CAD, dispatchers created roadblocks on CAD maps, which helped ensure all first responders avoided certain areas that were impassable.

"Every entry into our CAD system map was globally applied so that all users could see the changes in their mobile units within their patrol or rescue vehicles," McKinney said. "Being able to see those changes immediately enabled us to get help to where it was needed most despite the amount of debris on the roads."


Officers Face Historic Flooding to Save Lives

In the weeks leading up to the 2017 hurricane season, Chief Darrell Bush of the Nederland Police Department and Chief Paul Lemoine of the Port Neches Police Department participated in one storm preparation meeting after another, but none of it could have prepared them for what would happen once Hurricane Harvey made landfall in late August.


In just five days, the City of Nederland, Texas broke national records after 64.58 inches of rain drenched the community — 31.38 inches of which came down in a single day. Port Neches, Texas wasn't too far behind, receiving 64.51 inches of rainfall during the same time frame. 


The year prior, Texas led the country in flooding-related fatalities. In 2016, flash and river floods claimed 126 lives around the country and 38 in Texas. Nearly half of the victims were killed in a vehicle, likely trying to cross a flooded road.


However, tragedy was avoided in Nederland and Port Neches during Hurricane Harvey.


Wading through shoulder-deep water and working for hours on end, officers made every effort to help those in need. 


 "I was in the field the whole time. It was all hands-on deck," Lemoine said.


When the rain stopped, the sun finally reappeared, and the flooding started to recede, the two police departments had made a combined total of more than 180 rescues. No lives were lost due to flooding in Nederland or Port Neches and no officer was injured in the field.





Communication is Vital in Critical Situations

Every year, the Great Plains region of the US experiences severe thunderstorms throughout the summer months.

The summer of 2017 was no different for Independence, Missouri.

In mid-July, heavy storms hit this Kansas City metro area town causing damage to vehicles, homes, and businesses. High winds of more than 85 mph also caused downed trees and power lines, which led to power outages for several residents.

In addition, the rain and hail accompanying these storms resulted in flash flooding as it dumped more than three inches onto the town. Numerous roadways were impassable due to the trees and flooding, which caused routing issues for motorists and first responders.

In this type of situation, dispatchers and first responders are tasked with routing emergency personnel to those in need, which can be difficult when roads are impassable.

During that storm, the local 9-1-1 dispatch center in Independence fielded such a high call volume that they were running a modified response on emergency calls.

According to Independence Fire Dept. Battalion Chief Cindy Culp, a modified response helps ensure an effective level of coverage continues throughout the community despite emergency conditions that could absorb numerous resources.

"Any time the big storms hit, we're out there with police responding to weather-related calls for service and your every-day emergencies," Culp said. "It's important for dispatch to make sure there's enough coverage throughout the city to account for any emergency situation that arises as well as for of the events attributed to weather activity."

While the modified response prevented the city from running out of first responders to meet the needs of the community, first responders also had to deal with how to get to those in need.

"We had to be re-routed to several calls for service due to the condition of the roads," Culp said. "Dispatch helped with routing us to these incidents so that we could get help to where it was needed most."

Like many emergency responses, communication with other agencies and departments played a large role in effectively meeting the needs of the community during the storm.

According to Joanna Whitt, Records Administrator for the Independence Police Dept., the police and fire departments work together quite often in emergencies.

"In critical situations, we work closely with the fire department," Whitt said. "Anytime the police and fire departments are on the scene together, we share information with each other that pertains to safety for first responders and the public."

Watch: Police and Fire Departments Work Together in Independence, Missouri