The Call Blog

New World Public Safety The Call

The Call

rss

True stories from dispatchers, law enforcement, fire and EMS personnel who use New World public safety software to help them save lives, protect communities and increase efficiency


In Case You Missed It

Take a look back at this article to find out how the Oxnard Police Dept. in California was able to reduce the number of gang shootings in the city through the use of intelligence-led policing techniques.


Reducing Gang Activity Using Predictive Policing

With intelligence led policing, the Oxnard Police Dept. in California is reducing the number of gang shootings in the city.

Located in the Greater Los Angeles area, and with a population of about 207,000 residents, the Oxnard Police Department (PD) continually seeks ways of effectively addressing gang violence.

To combat this problem, the Oxnard PD uses information-driven policing techniques to help address gang activities, especially when there is a connection with violent crime.


The First Half of 2017

From fugitives on the run to massive pileups, the stories from The Call show the type of dynamic situations dispatchers, first responders, sworn officers, and civilian employees handle on a daily basis and the role that technology plays while they make communities safer together.

In looking back at the first half of 2017, the following posts and videos to The Call highlight the work of public safety personnel throughout the country:

Have a story you would like to share with The Call? Let us know!


Create Safer Communities using Data Analysis

This article is part four of a four-part series on intelligence and reporting tools Part one | Part two | Part three | Part four

When it comes to big data in public safety, getting to the big picture is important.

At public safety agencies across the country, command staff need to be able to identify and digest information about their communities quickly. That means they need to have the ability to analyze the vast amounts of data collected and stored within their public safety software systems. With the right intelligence and reporting tools, dashboard functionality helps make this happen.

Dashboards provide a high-level overview into crime trends and help easily identify large spikes in crimes or patterns. This data helps command staff to gather the necessary information to take action so they are better able to predict, prevent and reduce crimes.

When intelligence and reporting tools offer dashboards, it helps public safety personnel who aren't as familiar with law enforcement records management software to look at the same information to view instant updates regarding trends or crimes happening at that moment.

This functionality is especially beneficial when command staff have a specific question that needs answered. For instance, if command staff needs to know if burglaries have increased in a specific area, dashboards provide the answer. This actionable intelligence helps command staff to reallocate resources if necessary to increase patrol and reduce crime, which leads to safer communities.

Watch: Paradise Valley Police Dept. Integrates Data to Keep Community Safer




Using Public Safety Data for Safer Communities

Part 2 of a 4-part series on intelligence and reporting tools
Part one | Part two | Part three

The right kind of tools can enhance any task, and that's especially true for public safety agencies using big data.

When law enforcement agencies and fire departments analyze vast amounts of data using intelligence and analytical reporting tools, actionable intelligence is generated. This intelligence helps command staff identify trends, allocate or reallocate resources and predict, prevent or reduce crime.

But to make use of data that can help create actionable intelligence, it's important to use an intelligence and analytical tool that stores data on a Microsoft SQL server.

The SQL server has the ability to analyze vast amounts of data and present information in a digestible manner. The server can instantly compile data into digital cubes so users can extract information from the data and present the material in an Excel spreadsheet or heat map.

For example, if command staff wanted to know where most accidents were occurring in town, the right intelligence and analytical reporting tool would be able to show where accidents occurred, when they occurred, the frequency in which they occurred, and the time of day that they occurred.

The right tool can also identify correlations in the data and present information to users that could have been otherwise overlooked. To do this, the data is shown on a heat map, providing a visual representation of the data queried.

However, that does not mean the tool will present an agency or department with what it needs to do to reduce incidents. Rather, it provides the actionable intelligence so public safety professionals can make decisions based on data.

With this information, resources can be reallocated so that accidents or crimes or whatever the issue at hand is can be reduced. This leads to safer communities and more lives saved.